Transitory

Two versions of the same thing:

So we’re not giving up. How could we! Even though on the outside it often looks like things are falling apart on us, on the inside, where God is making new life, not a day goes by without his unfolding grace. These hard times are small potatoes compared to the coming good times, the lavish celebration prepared for us. There’s far more here than meets the eye. The things we see now are here today, gone tomorrow. But the things we can’t see now will last forever.

2 Corinthians 4:16-18 (The Message)

Therefore we do not become discouraged [spiritless, disappointed, or afraid]. Though our outer self is [progressively] wasting away, yet our inner self is being [progressively] renewed day by day. For our momentary, light distress [this passing trouble] is producing for us an eternal weight of glory [a fullness] beyond all measure [surpassing all comparisons, a transcendent splendor and an endless blessedness]! So we look not at the things which are seen, but at the things which are unseen; for the things which are visible are temporal [just brief and fleeting], but the things which are invisible are everlasting and imperishable.

2 Corinthians 4:16-18 (AMP)

With Christ it’s no longer a ‘this, too, shall pass’ – along the lines of Ecclesiastes – but a ‘this changes; I change’ by the grace of our dear Saviour. I’ve always loved the word ‘ephemeral’. It’s a cool word. It means that something is fleeting, changing, short-lived. But it always brings to mind the image of a butterfly, and then the word ‘ethereal’ seems to be intimately connected.

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How can I say no to this ephemeral, ethereal thing called Life?

Fellowship

Our relationships with other believers can be tragically shallow. Even small groups… can be more like superficial social clubs… Our fast-paced modern world makes it hard to slow down and invest in each other… Socialization and fellowship are [often] confused. They are not the same thing.

from Positively Powerless: How a Forgotten Movement Undermined Christianity by L.L. Martin (who blogs here)

This paragraph, from the final chapter of Laura’s excellent book, struck me as an incredibly powerful statement, and one that I know to be true. The vast majority of Christian encounters fall very much into the shallower end of fellowship, at best. The truest fellowship that I have ever experienced was that shared within Celebrate Recovery, where for a short space of time each week we could take off the ‘mask’ of everyday life and become our true, measly, weak selves. We could remove the Christian smile and the ‘hallelujah!’ attitude that pervades many churches here in the UK. Those things are not wrong, but they are wrong when they are constant and never tempered with the reality of sin and struggle.

Something miraculous happened at Celebrate Recovery. Every week, Jesus sat in that room alongside us as we confessed, and shared, and prayed, and wept. We grew to know one another at a deep level, we grew taller in our spiritual and emotional stature, we experienced profound and deep healing, and we experienced a true, spiritual fellowship. I pray God will bring Celebrate Recovery to our town, in His time. I know our town could use it! I pray that I will meet the right people, God-willing, to take on this none-too-small adventure.

Jesus… looked up to heaven and said… “I ask… on behalf of those who will believe in me through [my disciples’] word, that they may all be one. As you, Father, are in me and I am in you, may they also be in us, so that the world may believe that you have sent me. The glory that you have given me I have given them, so that they may be one, as we are one, I in them and you in me, that they may become completely one, so that the world may know that you have sent me and have loved them even as you have loved me.”

John 17:1,20-23 (NRSVA)

Reblog: The Paralympics, Disability and the Church

I sometimes wonder if Jesus would recognise what we now call ‘church’. People who are different, be it physically, emotionally, financially or otherwise, should not only be welcomed in our churches but valued and esteemed. Jesus always made room for those on the fringes. Throughout the bible God used the (seemingly) small and/or broken for His glory.

I am not virtuous because I have a disabling illness, paralympian or not. Perhaps the illness makes me more aware of my powerlessness (that’s another post) but the smallness of being that comes with struggles is exactly the way He – the Great Redeemer – grows big, bigger than anything I ever dreamed, even though to all outward appearances I yet remain in the smallness.

I’m very tired today. Neurological disorders tend to do that. So I am not sure if I am making sense 😴 Should probably not be blogging so I’ll leave it there. Please read Matt’s post. He makes some very pertinent points that really should be higher up the radar of Christianity today.

The Left Hand of Ehud: Matt's Bible Blog

The Paralympics start today!

I have two children with disabilities, becoming their dad in 2012. That was around the time of the London Olympics, withits mythic opening ceremony, and the first time I remember theParalympics really entering the public consciousness.
Or maybe it was just my perspective that had been broadened; maybe I was seeing the world with new eyes and a different perspective and a glimmer of awareness of my own privilege. A lot of that has beenworked out on this blog.

Four years later and the Paralympics have come round again. There have been concerns about their viability due to poor ticket sales, and that might be telling, but ultimately the Paralympics allow us to celebrate sporting excellence, and
that’s great. I hope Team GB win lots of medals, and I’ll becheering on Team Refugees too. I’m not a sportyperson…

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Suffering for Love of Jesus and Neighbours

Wow. “‘My grace is sufficient for you, for my power is made perfect in weakness.’ Therefore I will boast all the more gladly about my weaknesses, so that Christ’s power may rest on me… For when I am weak, then I am strong.” (2 Cor 12:9,10)

 

On a spiritual level, I know this is true, but… I’ve been through so much. Yet the prayer ‘please don’t let me suffer’ seems self-absorbed and heartless when I consider all those who do still suffer, and whose brief lives are filled with pain. So then I come back to LOVE, for His sake, which says my own human experiences are neither one way or the other, because God never changes. And I give thanks for what IS, one day at a time. I pray that whatever comes, I will stand, and that whatever comes, I will serve, and that whatever comes, I will love. Each step by grace.

 

I am reminded of the beautiful words of Teresa de Avila (which I know by heart because they are such a comfort when in recovery from PTSD):

Let nothing trouble you.

Let nothing frighten you.

All things are passing;

God never changes.

Patient endurance attains all things.

Whoever has God lacks nothing;

God alone is enough.

Contemplative in the Mud

VanDuring the days that I pass on earth, I find no joy comparable to that of having to suffer. Even though, naturally, I am afraid of suffering, I accept it with joy for love of Jesus… It is in walking in the midst of thorns that we can understand the Love of Jesus for us and to prove our love for other souls.
Little Brother Marcel Văn CSsR (1928–1959)

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